Curriculum



South Kingstown ELA Curriculum

South Kingstown High School is in the process of implementing a revised 9-12 grade curriculum, aligned to the Common Core State Standards while also expanding opportunities for student choice and support.  Links to current documents relating to this curriculum revision appear at the bottom of this page.

English Curriculum Table

Students are required to earn four credits in English in order to graduate. The table below outlines the sequence of English courses SKHS offers. Please note this table is made available as a guide only, and students should consult with their parents, teachers, reading specialists, and/or guidance counselors before making a final decision.  Scroll down for a fuller description of individual course offerings.




Grade
General
Honors
Literature is the thought of thinking souls.
—Thomas Carlyle
9
English 9
Honors English 9
One of the obligations of the writer is to say or sing all that he or she can, to deal with as much of the world as becomes possible to him or her in language.
—Denise Levertov
10
Literature of the Modern World 10

Classics of American Literature 10
Honors American Literature
The difficulty of literature is not to write; but to write what you mean; not to  affect your reader, but to affect him precisely as you wish.
—Robert Louis Stevenson
11
Survey of Western Humanities 11

Heroes and Antiheroes 11
Honors Humanities 11 /
AP English 11Humanities 11
A classic is classic not because it conforms to certain structural rules, or fits certain definitions (of which its author had quite probably never heard). It is classic because of a certain eternal and irrepressible freshness.
—Edith Wharton
12
Senior Options
(See Below)
A.P. English 12 /
R.I.C. 118: Introduction to the Literary Experience
Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested.
—Sir Francis Bacon


SENIOR OPTIONS: Seniors are required to take one semester of literature and one semester of writing. The selections are as follows:

Literature
The American Game: The Literature of Baseball
Classic Literature of Horror: Misunderstood Monsters
Literary Approaches to Drama (R.I.C. Early Enrollment Program)
Literary Drama
Multicultural Literature (Literature of the Other World)
Poetry and the Short Story
Shakespeare
Writing on Themes in Literature (full-year course meets the requirements for Literature and Writing)
Women's Literature
World Literature

                                                                                                        
Writing
Advanced Writing
Advanced Writing in Journalism
Autobiographical Writing
Creative Writing
Writing on Themes in Literature (full-year course meets the requirements for Literature and Writing)
Writing in a Contemporary Culture (Analysis of Media through Writing)
URI Writing 104: Writing to Inform and Explain

                                                
ELECTIVES
An Introduction to Speech and Debate  (Grades 10-12)
University of Rhode Island Writing 104: Writing to Inform and Explain  (Seniors Only)
        (3 hours of college and high school credit)
Journalism - The Rebellion  (Grades 10-12)
Writing in Electronic Environments
Writing for Community Service

                                                                



South Kingstown High School Department of English Language Arts
2014-2015 PROGRAM OF STUDIES

The English Language Arts Department’s philosophy is that through the critical study of language and literature, we may enable students to better understand and contribute to the world they live in, encourage them to explore and understand the “text” of their own lives as well as the lives of others, and empower them to be life-long readers, writers, speakers, listeners, and critical thinkers.  The South Kingstown High School Student Leaning Expectations, the Rhode Island Grade Span Expectations, and the national Common Core of State Standards are integral to achieving this goal.  Our purpose is, through a comprehensive, integrated curriculum, to enable all students to develop the skills necessary to become effective communicators, and to use language fluently in all of its forms to enhance their lives and their world.

Summer reading is mandatory for all South Kingstown High School English courses.


GRADE 9 ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:  Who Am I?  
How does literature explore questions of personal identity?

English 9:  Writing From Literature  11100 (1 credit)
Through a broad range of writing assignments, full-class discussions, and small-group activities, students explore topics and themes in developmentally appropriate literature below, at, and above grade level, in a variety of genres (short story, novel, non-fiction, poetry, and drama), with an emphasis on comprehension, inference, literary analysis, and communication skills.  The course also provides a structured review of basic vocabulary, spelling, usage, and composition skills, and focuses on establishing a foundation for further application of those skills at the high school and college level.  Course requirements include one oral presentation by each student.  Additionally, the course exposes students to a range of writing types: practical, academic, and creative.  The comprehensive course assessment for this class is a literary response essay on one of the course’s core texts.  (SLE: A1, A2)

Honors English 9: Writing From Literature  11109 (1 credit)
Through a broad range of writing assignments, full-class discussions, and small-group activities, students explore themes and issues in literature at and above grade level in a variety of genres: short story, novel, non-fiction, poetry, and drama, with an emphasis on self-directed literary analysis, inferential and abstract thinking, and communication skills.  This course also focuses on the development of rigorous vocabulary, spelling, usage, and composition skills.  Course requirements include one oral presentation by each student.  Additionally, the course exposes students to literature-based analytical essays and a myriad of writing types: practical, academic, and creative.  The comprehensive course assessment for this class is a literary response essay on one of the course’s core texts.  (SLE: A1, A2)

GRADE 10 ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:  What Is America?  What Is a Community?  
How does literature express and explore what it means to be part of a community?

Literature of the Modern World 10 (1 credit)
In this course, students explore contemporary topics through historical, early modern, and contemporary literature in a variety of forms, including short stories, novels, plays, and non-fiction. The course is structured in thematic units focused on key issues and conflicts facing the modern world: Nature and Civilization; Faith and Reason; Unity and Diversity; Freedom and Responsibility. The course provides an in-depth study of literary genres and terms.  Students will exercise a range of critical reading strategies in addition to developing their skills in analytical, argumentative, and narrative writing.  Writing instruction focuses on using the writing process in essay composition (expository, analytical, argumentative, and persuasive) to produce substantive content through precise, coherent, error-free writing, with developmentally appropriate vocabulary and standard usage.  Course requirements include two research papers (one short, one longer) utilizing MLA format, and a minimum of two oral presentations, one informative and one argumentative/persuasive.  The comprehensive course assessment (CCA) for this class is a literature-based argumentative/persuasive composition.   (SLEs: A1, A2, C5)

Classics of American Literature 10 (1 credit)
In this course, students will examine the development of American cultural identity as expressed through our nation’s literature from the pre-Colonial era up to the present, in a variety of forms, including short stories, novels, plays, and non-fiction.  Though organized generally according to historical chronology, the course focuses on recurring themes defined by essential conflicts that have characterized American history (Nature v. Civilization, Faith v. Reason, Unity v. Diversity, Individualism v. Community, and Freedom v. Responsibility).  The course provides an in-depth study of literary genres and terms.  Students will exercise a range of critical reading strategies in addition to developing their skills in analytical, argumentative, and narrative writing.  Writing instruction focuses on using the writing process in essay composition (expository, analytical, argumentative, and persuasive) to produce substantive content through precise, coherent, error-free writing, with developmentally appropriate vocabulary and standard usage.  Course requirements include two research papers (one short, one longer) utilizing MLA format, and a minimum of two oral presentations, one informative and one argumentative/persuasive.  The comprehensive course assessment (CCA) for this class is a literature-based argumentative/persuasive composition.  (SLE: A1, A2, C5)

Honors English 10: American Literature  11110 (1 credit)
This course examines American and multicultural voices and themes through historical and contemporary literature at and above grade level in a variety of forms, including short stories, novels, plays, and non-fiction.  Instruction focuses on in-depth exploration of literature for appreciation and analysis, using a broad range of critical reading strategies.  Students will examine and practice a variety of writing formats, including literary analysis and academic research.  Expectations for students’ writing emphasize coherence and organization, analytical depth, stylistic precision and variety, and documentation.  Course requirements include two research papers utilizing MLA format and a minimum of two oral presentations, informative and persuasive.  The comprehensive course assessment for this class is a literature-based persuasive composition.  (SLE: A1, A2, C5)

GRADE 11 HUMANITIES ESSENTIAL QUESTION:  What Is Culture?  
How do literature and other forms of expression convey and shape a culture’s values?

Survey of Western Humanities 11  ________ (1 credit)
This course is an overview of European, American, and world literature from ancient through modern times, supplemented by the study of other forms of expression from each time period.  In this course, students will examine the development of cultural characteristics and principles as conveyed through literature and other modes of communication.  Though organized generally according to historical chronology, the course focuses on recurring themes that have defined and shaped Western cultural attitudes over the centuries: Order and Balance; Power and Authority; Faith; Humanism; Reason; Nature; Freedom; and Change. Students will extend the range of critical reading strategies acquired in Grades 9 and 10, in addition to further developing their skills in analytical, argumentative, and narrative writing.  Writing instruction focuses on using the writing process in essay composition (expository, analytical, argumentative, and persuasive) to produce well-supported content through precise, coherent, error-free writing, with developmentally appropriate vocabulary and standard usage.  Independent reading is expected at times throughout the school year.  The comprehensive course assessment for this class is a fully-documented research essay on a Humanities-related topic.  (SLE: A1, A2, A4)

Heroes and Antiheroes 11 ________ (1 credit)
In this course, students will examine the expression of cultural values through the archetypal figure of the hero, as conveyed through literature and other modes of communication.  The core content of the course examines the cultural role of the hero throughout history, but with an emphasis on the archetype’s universal and contemporary relevance.  The course is structured in thematic units focused on key aspects of the hero archetype: Heroes of Myth and Folklore (foundational and epic heroes); Heroes of Service and Sacrifice (philosophical and religious heroes); Heroes and Antiheroes of Power (war heroes and political leaders, including the US founders); Heroes and Antiheroes of Everyday Life.  Students will extend the range of critical reading strategies acquired in Grades 9 and 10, in addition to further developing their skills in analytical, argumentative, and narrative writing.  Writing instruction focuses on using the writing process in essay composition (expository, analytical, argumentative, and persuasive) to produce well-supported content through precise, coherent, error-free writing, with developmentally appropriate vocabulary and standard usage.  Independent reading is expected at times throughout the school year.  The comprehensive course assessment for this class is a fully-documented research essay on a topic related to the course’s main themes.  (SLE: A1, A2, A4)

AP English Language and Composition (Honors Humanities 11)  11111 (1 credit)
This course is a survey of European, American, and world literature, supplemented by the study of the fine arts.  Classic works are studied in depth with rigorous writing assignments that emphasize rhetorical strategies, formal analysis, and academic writing style.  Independent reading is required during the summer and throughout the school year.  The comprehensive course assessment for this class is a fully-documented research essay on a Humanities-related topic.  (SLE: A1, A2, A4)

GRADE 12 ESSENTIAL QUESTION:  Who Will I Be?  
How can one use writing to express and explore questions of personal identity and responsibility?

AP English Literature and Composition 11112 (1 credit)  (Full Year)
This course examines literature as an art form and as an expression of universal themes through diverse cultural voices.  In this course students will learn to immerse themselves in challenging works of literature as an aesthetic experience, and to probe literature analytically.  The comprehensive course assessment for this class is a fully-documented research essay and presentation on a literary topic.  Students taking this course are eligible for credit in conjunction with the Rhode Island College Early Enrollment Program.  Extensive summer reading is required.  Prerequisite: Final grade of B- or above in A.P. English Language and Composition 11 or departmental approval.   (SLE: A1, A2)
        
ENGLISH COURSES FOR SENIORS
ELECTIVES FOR UNDERCLASSMEN

From the following courses for Grade 12, seniors-to-be must select one writing course (1/2 credit) and one literature course (1/2 credit).  Due to minimum enrollment requirements for these courses, each student should also indicate a second choice in both the writing and literature categories.  Subject to the availability of space, some of these senior English courses may be made available as English electives for seniors and/or underclassmen.  

Writing on Themes in Literature 12 11152 (1 credit) (Full Year)
Students will read, discuss, interpret, and analyze contemporary and classic literature exploring universal issues that writers throughout the ages have addressed.  Students will respond to them through a variety of writing modes, including expository, reflective, and narrative.  The comprehensive course assessment for this class is a fully-documented research assignment.  This year-long course meets both the writing and the literature requirements for 12th-grade English.  (SLE: A1, A2)


WRITING OPTIONS (1/2 credit each)
ESSENTIAL QUESTION:  Who Will I Be?
How can one use writing to express and explore questions of personal identity and responsibility?

Advanced Writing 12  11142 (1/2 credit) (1 semester)  
Students will review and practice in-depth analysis of various forms of literature, examining literary devices, historical context, and cultural impact.  Students will learn and apply an understanding of sophisticated writing techniques, documentation skills, and various types of writing, including college essays.  The comprehensive course assessment for this class is a fully-documented research assignment.  (SLE: A1, A2)

Advanced Writing in Journalism 12  11190 (1/2 credit) (1 semester)
Students will utilize the investigative approach to write about contemporary issues and social trends through well-researched reports, features, and opinion pieces.  Students will produce writings in a variety of newspaper and magazine formats, and completed writing assignments will be considered for publication in the school newspaper   Students interested in taking this class to show dedication in conducting independent research, studying contemporary issues, and crafting rigorous multi-page compositions.   Field trips may include Columbia & New England Scholastic Journalism workshops as well as the University of Rhode Island student media day.  The comprehensive course assessment for this class is a fully-documented research assignment.  (SLE: A1, A2, A3, C6)

Autobiographical Writing 12  11134 (1/2 credit) (1 semester)  
Students will read contemporary and historical autobiographical texts of varied lengths and study the wide-ranging themes and techniques common to memoir-writing.  At the same time, student will work on creating their own autobiographies/memoirs, a final product that will serve as a summation of the themes and techniques they have explored through their readings while also reflecting their own experiences and values (and that for many students will be a keepsake for years to come).  The comprehensive course assessment for this class is a fully-documented research assignment.  (SLE: A1, A2)

Creative Writing 12  11195 (1/2 credit) (1 semester)  
By creating their own poems, stories, and other narratives, students will explore the craft and emulate the techniques of a variety of distinguished literary works, and will be encouraged to develop their own authorial voice through conscious attention to diction, details, figurative language, imagery, tone, and syntax.  Authors will be invited to the classroom to share their experiences and insights.  The comprehensive course assessment for this class is a fully-documented research assignment.  (SLE: A1, A2)

University of Rhode Island Writing 104: Writing to Inform and Explain  11145 (1/2 credit) (1 semester) Grade 12  
This course emphasizes the sharing of information, exploring  and developing mastery of a range of expository writing strategies for differing audiences and situations.  Students will produce writings in a variety of genres, including narratives, memoirs, profiles, research papers, public letters, and analysis of complex text.  The course emphasizes the writing process through real-world, practical writing assignments.  Students taking this course are eligible for credit in conjunction with the University of Rhode Island.  The payment of a mandatory URI registration fee is due at the commencement of the class.  Students will be expected to purchase their textbooks.  (SLE: A1, A2)

Writing in a Contemporary Culture 12 (Analysis of Media through Writing 12)  11130 (1/2 credit) (1 semester)  
Students will view, discuss, and write analytically and critically about the varied aspects of complex media, with a focus on classic and contemporary cinema.  The major emphasis is on the specialized techniques used in the media to combine theme, structure, language, imagery, and sound.  The comprehensive course assessment for this class is a fully-documented research assignment. (SLE: A1, A2, A4)


LITERATURE OPTIONS (1/2 credit each)
ESSENTIAL QUESTION:  Who Will I Be?
How does literature express and explore questions of personal identity and responsibility?

The American Game: The Literature of Baseball 12  11165 (1/2 credit) (1 semester)
Students will, read, discuss, interpret, and analyze the literature of baseball as a metaphor of American life.   The primary focus will be the literary elements specific to sports literature, both fiction and non-fiction, as well as the history and culture of baseball.  The Baseball Reader, The Natural, Eight Men Out, Shoeless Joe, Moneyball, and The Baseball Abstract are some of the works explored.  Students will also examine references to the sport in such American literary classics as The Great Gatsby, The Catcher in the Rye, The Old Man and the Sea, and One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest.  Field trips may include: The Baseball Hall of Fame, McCoy Stadium, and Fenway Park.  The comprehensive course assessment for this class is a fully-documented research assignment.  (SLE: A1, A2)

Classic Literature of Horror: Misunderstood Monsters 12  11167 (1/2 credit) (1 semester)
Students will read, discuss, interpret, and analyze classic literature involving the archetypal figure of the monster, from the natural-born “monster” in The Elephant Man to the man-made monster in Frankenstein to the imagined/invented monster in Dracula.  Students will explore what these narratives reveal about human behavior when faced with the unknown or unusual.  The comprehensive course assessment for this class is a fully-documented research assignment.  (SLE: A1, A2)

Literary Approaches to Drama  11179 (1/2 credit) (1 semester) Grade 12
In this college-level course students will trace the development of drama from Greek through modern times.  They will read, discuss, interpret, and analyze award-winning, literary plays of the last century.  This course will provide students with information about the playwrights’ lives and the historical factors that influenced them.  Independent reading is required throughout the semester.  The comprehensive course assessment for this class is a fully-documented research assignment.  Students taking this course are eligible for credit in conjunction with the Rhode Island College Early Enrollment Program.  Students will be expected to purchase a drama anthology.  
(SLE: A1, A2, A4)

Literary Drama 12  11173 (1/2 credit) (1 semester)   
Like the 11th-grade Humanities course, this course traces cultural development from Greek through modern times, but with the focus exclusively on drama.  Students will read, discuss, interpret, and analyze classic and award-winning plays of the past and present, as well as investigating the historical factors that influenced the works.  Emphasis will be placed on the historical, cultural, and literary aspects of each drama studied. The comprehensive course assessment for this class is a fully-documented research assignment. (SLE: A1, A2, A4)

Multicultural Literature 12  11168 (1/2 credit) (1 semester)
Students will read, analyze, and discuss literature written by and about people who have traditionally been denied a voice, with a focus on literature from the developing world.  Readings will examine prompt discussions and research about past and present injustices associated with different cultures.  The specific texts to be studied will vary depending upon student interest.  The comprehensive course assessment for this class is a fully-documented research assignment. (SLE: A1, A2)

Shakespeare 12  11171(1/2 credit) (1 semester)  
In this course students will read, discuss, interpret, and analyze a variety of Shakespeare’s comedies, tragedies, and histories.  Students will study the literary elements characteristic of these genres, the theatrical aspect of Shakespeare work, thematic strands common to his plays, and the literary artistry that distinguishes them.  The comprehensive course assessment for this class is a fully-documented research assignment. (SLE: A1, A2)

The Study of Poetry and the Short Story 12  11164 (1/2 credit) (1 semester)
Students will read, discuss, interpret, and analyze classical and contemporary poetry and short stories.  Literary elements specific to these two genres will be examined.  An emphasis will be placed upon the authors’ craft, as well as historical and cultural influences.  The comprehensive course assessment for this class is a fully-documented research assignment. (SLE: A1, A2)

Women’s Literature 12  11163 (1/2 credit) (1 semester)  
Students will read, discuss, interpret, and analyze literature about women’s issues in the media, family life, and politics.  Through the literature, students will examine the varied and changing perceptions of and by women in our culture.  The comprehensive course assessment for this class is a fully-documented research assignment. (SLE: A1, A2)

World Literature 12  11140 (1/2 credit) (1 semester)  
Students will explore other cultures through literature.  They will read, interpret, and analyze classical and contemporary literature from Asia, Europe, Africa, Australia, and South America.  Instruction will focus on the cultural foundations of the works as well as on the authors’ backgrounds to enhance the students’ understanding and appreciation.  The comprehensive course assessment for this class is a fully-documented research assignment. (SLE: A1, A2)


SPEECH AND WRITING ELECTIVES
(Not for English credit)

An Introduction to Speech and Debate  11161 (1/2 credit) (1 semester) Grades 10-12
This course is an introduction to the basic elements of speech and debate, both formal and informal.  Students present warm-up speeches on personal subjects.  Then students will craft and deliver informative, demonstration, and persuasive speeches.  The course emphasizes the use of reliable evidence and logical reasoning.  Delivery skills such as eye contact, body language, and vocal control are emphasized.  Debates focus on local, national, and international controversies, with students conducting research on the affirmative and the negative positions.  Timed debates occur before audiences.  Seniors are expected to deliver a graduation speech.  (SLE: A1, A2)  
Prerequisite: Successful completion of 9th grade English.  

Journalism - The Rebellion  11196 (1 credit) Grades 10-12
This course will train students in both creative and journalistic writing and teach basic desktop publishing skills.  To satisfy course requirements, students are responsible for all aspects of the production and publication of the school newspaper: advertising, sales, researching, writing, and editing forms of print journalism, functional and public documents, editorials, and essays.  Note: This is a year-long course.  (SLE: A1, A2)  
Prerequisite: Successful completion of 9th grade English.

Writing in Electronic Environments  _________ (1/2 credit) (1 semester) Grades 9-12
In this course, students will examine, investigate, and practice digital writing. Written products will be published through a variety of technology platforms, including Web design, blogs, wikis, social net-working technologies, presentation software, and construction of a digital portfolio.
**Awaiting approval from URI to earn college-level credits.

Writing for Community Service  __________ (1/2 credit) (1 semester) Grades 9-12
This course will consist of the study and practice of writing in the context of community service organizations. Requires community service outside class, in addition to research, writing, and design. May include grant proposals, brochures, websites, or reports.
**Awaiting approval from URI to earn college-level credits.


SUPPORT CLASSES
(Not for English credit)

Writers Workshop 9-12 ______________ (1/2 credit per semester)
This course assists students in increasing their proficiency in the writing skills needed to succeed in a high school course of study and beyond. It is designed to individualize instruction and increase proficiency in identified composition skills and processes. The curriculum, instruction, and assessment focus on identifying and improving the student’s level of proficiency in: mastery of foundational writing skills; use of the writing process; and application through a range of written tasks, genres, and forms of self-expression. This course is open to all students.  Mandatory enrollment in this course is contingent on standardized testing data, performance in ELA course writing tasks and assessments, and/or the Personal Literacy Plan (PLP) of selected students; other students may elect to enroll in the course as an elective (SLE: A2, A3)

Readers Workshop 9-12 __________________ (1/2 credit per semester)
This course is designed to assist students in increasing their proficiency in the English/Language Arts skills needed to succeed in a high school course of study.  The curriculum, student assessments, and student portfolio reflect the course’s focus on increasing students’ proficiency in comprehending a range of materials of varying length and complexity, their ability to analyze and interpret what they read in the process of becoming critical readers, and their ability to write effectively in a variety of formats according to current standards of correctness.  Enrollment is this course is contingent on standardized testing data and the Personal Literacy Plan (PLP) of the selected students.  (SLE: A1, A2)